Wednesday, June 18, 2014

Giving Circles and Donors of Color to Gather for Community Investment Network’s 10th Anniversary Conference


 photo cin13_MG_21592_zps5d099d8c.jpg
Giving circle members and donors take a photo during a site visit at the 2013 Community Investment Network
conference in Denver, Colorado

DURHAM, NC — Community Investment Network (CIN) will host its 2014 National Conference at the Sheraton Imperial Hotel and Conference Center in Durham, North Carolina, October 2-5. “Coming Full Circle” is the theme of the 10th anniversary conference.  The public is invited to participate in the conference to learn more about the impact of giving circles and how CIN members are working to transform communities.

“This is a homecoming because CIN was founded in the Raleigh-Durham area 10 years ago,” says Board Chair Darcel Madkins.  “This region is the epicenter of the network, and our giving circles have frequently convened here.  Celebrating our milestone anniversary in Durham truly is coming full circle.”

For a decade, CIN has charted new paths in philanthropy by mobilizing grant-making giving circles composed of grassroots givers and donors of color.  Giving circles are a way for people to pool resources and invest time, talent and treasure to build community and invest in creating social change.  Cultivating over 200 members and 16 giving circles across nine states and growing, CIN carries a mission to inspire, connect and strengthen African Americans and communities of color to leverage their collective resources and create the change THEY wish to see.

CIN Founder Darryl K. Lester and Linetta Gilbert, a longtime champion of community-led philanthropy, are the conference’s honorary co-chairs.  The 2014 conference is set to provide an invigorating mix of fellowship and learning, with a focus on stories of impact.  Plenary and breakout sessions will focus on why giving circles are a powerful vehicle for philanthropy and civic engagement, what giving circles across the country are doing and how to start and sustain a giving circle.  Conference sessions will also explore the intersection of faith and generosity, initiatives focused on Black boys and girls and children of color, cultivating the next generation of givers, and more.

Jacqueline Copeland-Carson, Ph.D., an international consultant on philanthropy and founder of Black Philanthropy Month, is a featured speaker.  She states, “I am delighted to share my thoughts about 21st century Black philanthropy at the CIN 10th anniversary celebration and conference.  CIN serves a unique national role in championing the power of Black giving to transform our communities and broader society.”

Lake Institute on Faith and Giving at Indiana University Lilly Family School of Philanthropy is a conference sponsor this year.  Lake Associate Director, Aimee Laramore shared, “Being a part of the CIN conference provides a new opportunity to explore how faith informs and inspires philanthropy.  We expect to learn as much as we share in an environment that celebrates a commitment to live life actively expressing love of humankind.”

Register and learn more about the CIN 2014 National Conference at thecommunityinvestment.org. An early-bird special provides discounted registration rates through June.  Giving Circle Coordinator Tony Pigford is available at tony@thecommunityinvestment.org to answer questions about membership and the conference.

CIN is currently seeking sponsors for its 10th anniversary conference.  Inquiries about sponsorships can be sent to Valaida Fullwood, interim Executive Director, at valaida@thecommunityinvestment.org.

About Community Investment Network: CIN is a nonprofit membership organization that inspires, connects and strengthens African Americans and communities of color to leverage their collective resources and create the change THEY wish to see.  Listen to the voices and stories of CIN giving circle members in the video “When We Stand Together.”

Photo: Sino Chum

2 comments:

COPPERTINO said...

Tbe time has been long spent when African Americans first came TOGETHER to build over 60 new townships after slavery was abolished in America. They performed miracles then, and now a larger miracle looms is needed to show our present generation that if we are to survive as a people, the way we have survived in America for over 400 years and counting; in spite of the bashing of full blooded african american children born with extra kinky hair; we must continue to share our finances, strength and faith for a better tomorrow, and the earned respect that comes only by taking care of one's people, now and for the generations to follow

COPPERTINO said...

Tbe time has been long spent when African Americans first came TOGETHER to build over 60 new townships after slavery was abolished in America. They performed miracles then, and now a larger miracle looms is needed to show our present generation that if we are to survive as a people, the way we have survived in America for over 400 years and counting; in spite of the bashing of full blooded african american children born with extra kinky hair; we must continue to share our finances, strength and faith for a better tomorrow, and the earned respect that comes only by taking care of one's people, now and for the generations to follow